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You think you’re better than the cashier at McDonald’s.

We give lip-service to supporting a minimum wage hike, but we don’t put nearly as much effort into doing something about it.  What happens to your own sense of worth in this capitalist society when the guy at Taco Bell is in the same income bracket you are?

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The fast food strikes across the country aren’t causing nearly as much conversation as they should be.  Everyone was on the Occupy Wall Street bandwagon – where are all of those voices of support now?  Why are people so ambivalent toward the low pay at places like McDonald’s and Burger King?

mcd

Because you don’t want the fry cook to make as much money as you do.

You did everything the “right” way.  You finished high school and got your degree.  You did unpaid internships and worked a part-time job to make ends meet.  Now you’ve gotten an entry-level position in your white-collar field making $30,000 to start.  You’re working 50-60 hour weeks under a boss you hate hoping a better job will come along and doing your best at this one so someone will take notice and give you a raise or a promotion.  You did everything “right.”

So why should the single mother with a GED taking your money at McDonald’s make $15 an hour?  She didn’t go to college.  She didn’t pay her dues at internships.  She doesn’t have a mountain of student debt as her reward for getting a magical piece of paper that opens doors to a job interview.  Why should she get paid as much money as you do?

That’s the hurdle the minimum wage battle is facing.  The way we pay our workers is a direct reflection on how we value people in those positions.  We pay doctors truckloads of money because they save lives.  We respect them.  They went to school for a decade and we reward them for it.  We pay construction workers a fraction of that because they just pour cement and swing hammers.  They didn’t go to school for years and years so their contribution to society matters less and we pay them accordingly.  Nevermind the fact that those doctors can’t do their jobs without buildings to house their practice, we put construction workers ten rungs below them.

We give lip-service to supporting a minimum wage hike, but we don’t put nearly as much effort into doing something about it.  What happens to your own sense of worth in this capitalist society when the guy at Taco Bell is in the same income bracket you are?  Whatever your employment complaints, you can always say “well…at least I’m not making minimum wage at KFC” but that pep talk is taken away if the minimum wage makes its way to livable standard.

So we sit back and watch the protests on television and read about the strikes on the Internet but we’re not moved to take action.  It’s not a conscious decision – it’s just a byproduct of being brought up in our competitive American marketplace.  Hit the books!  Get a degree!  Work hard!  Achieve the American Dream!

Unfortunately, the American Dream is moving further and further out of reach, not just for the bottom rungs of the economic ladder, but for those who also did everything “right.”  The “right” way kids are now having to settle for what should have been the minimum all along and a new bottom of the heap has to be forged to separate the two.  With any luck, these strikes could be the beginning of a real in-depth conversation about income inequality in this country.  The top of the ladder can be brought closer to the bottom, but only if we all take up the cause.  Don’t avoid the fast food worker’s plight because you’re afraid of your own social status.  Step up and support your neighbors so that our kids might actually have a shot at that American Dream we were brought up to believe in.

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economy

CNBC: The budget breakdown of a 25-year-old who makes $100,000 a year and is excellent with money

Gen X & Baby Boomer media is about making millennials feel shitty about not being exponentially more successful and more educated than they had to be at the same age to maintain the same standard of living. Y’all had my salary with a HS diploma working at Auto Zone. Go away.

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Trevor Klee, he admits, is a “terrible employee.” But he’s great at working for himself — and at taking tests.

So the 25-year-old entrepreneur started a thriving business of his own. As a test prep instructor in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he brings in $100,000 a year tutoring people for the GMAT, GRE and LSAT. “It’s one of those weird skills that turned out to be really monetizable,” he tells CNBC Make It.

Klee is the first to acknowledge he’s benefited from both luck and privilege: “Growing up in a family that talked a lot about money was a definite advantage,” he says. “In a lot of ways, I feel like I’m good with money, but I’m playing life on ‘Easy’ mode: I’m a single guy with no dependents and I make a pretty solid income.”

Here’s a look at how Klee earns, saves and spends his money, and how he gives it away

(cont.)

typical

He’s 25 years old and makes $100,000 a year paying $825 rent.

When I was 25 I made $30,000 a year paying $900 rent.

I don’t understand who these articles are for.

Gen X & Baby Boomer media is about making millennials feel shitty about not being exponentially more successful and more educated than they had to be at the same age to maintain the same standard of living. Y’all had my salary with a HS diploma working at Auto Zone. Go away.

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economy

WaPo: Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates

Pay workers more and treat them like people. If your employees feel expendable, they have no problem ghosting on that spot that you’ll easily fill with someone else you don’t care about.

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Economists report that workers are starting to act like millennials on Tinder: They’re ditching jobs with nary a text.

“A number of contacts said that they had been ‘ghosted,’ a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact,” the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago noted in December’s Beige Book, which tracks employment trends.

National data on economic “ghosting” is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise.

(cont.)

The author says ghosting on a job, as in leaving and not telling anyone, is partly due to bad social skills.

But we all know that’s crap, don’t we?

I gave one job two month’s notice to replace me because I knew it’d be difficult and I loved my boss. I can go back to that job anytime I want and I have no hard feelings toward that office bc my transition out of the job was smooth, just as I thought it’d be.

Just one job tho.

Everybody else got two weeks or less because I was leaving due to how much I hated the job, the pay, the management, etc. These jobs are not loyal to workers so why should we be loyal to the job? They can fire you with no notice but you have to give them 2 to 4 weeks? Pfffffffft!

That job will be just fine and will most likely have your replacement next week. And some intentionally make your life hell after you put in your notice.

You get a notice if I feel like you deserve a notice.

And co-workers don’t need to know your business. I don’t need buddies at the office – that’s work. I’m on Twitter instead of roaming around making chit chat because office gossip is how you fumble your bag. I don’t need any whispers behind my back about anything.

None of that has to do with “social skills” or any other lazy excuse.
Pay workers more and treat them like people. If your employees feel expendable, they have no problem ghosting on that spot that you’ll easily fill with someone else you don’t care about.

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economy

Vox: Paul Ryan’s Long Con

Anybody still giving the benefit of the doubt to Republicans needs to go outside and break off a switch. Republicans keep playing this “fiscal responsibility” card, and too many of us keep falling for it to debate its merits as if their positions ever hold fast once they get elected. “Fiscal responsibility” is a catchphrase to bring two groups to the polls: rich people and poor whites.

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paulryan

House Speaker Paul Ryan’s legacy can be summed up in just one number: $343 billion.

That’s the increase between the deficit for fiscal year 2015 and fiscal year 2018— that is, the difference between the fiscal year before Ryan became speaker of the House and the fiscal year in which he retired.

If the economy had fallen into recession between 2015 and 2018, Ryan’s record would be understandable. But it didn’t. In fact, growth quickened and the labor market tightened — which means deficits should’ve fallen. Indeed, that’s exactly what happened in each of the five years preceding Ryan’s speakership; from 2011 to 2015, annual deficits fell each year.

As he prepares to leave office, Ryan says that debt reduction is one of those things “I wish we could have gotten done.” Ryan, the man with the single most power over the federal budget in recent years, sounds like a bystander, as if he watched laws happen rather than made them happen.

(cont.)

paulryan

Anybody still giving the benefit of the doubt to Republicans needs to go outside and break off a switch. Republicans keep playing this “fiscal responsibility” card, and too many of us keep falling for it to debate its merits as if their positions ever hold fast once they get elected. “Fiscal responsibility” is a catchphrase to bring two groups to the polls: rich people and poor whites.

Rich people hear “fiscal responsibility” and they know their taxes will be cut. The GOP uses “fiscal responsibility” as part of their funny math to justify cutting taxes for corporations and rich people. The rich don’t actually care that the math doesn’t add up — they just know the politicians they elected are using that ruse to get over on the rest of the country, that their politicians are saying “we have to curb spending, and once we have less stuff to pay for, we don’t need as much tax revenue coming in” and then voila — the rich get richer.

Poor whites hear “fiscal responsibility” and they feel like the coloreds and the immigrants will be getting fewer handouts. Never mind the fact that it’s Republican states that take the most from the federal government and contribute the least, because facts don’t matter. Only perception matters, and the perception among poor whites is that they are struggling while Blacks & Muslims & Mexicans are living high on the hog thanks to welfare programs that taxes pay for. Why should they get free stuff from the government while Good Americans (white ones) are scrimping and saving to pay the bills? Those poor whites vote for politicians pimping austerity measures against their own self-interests because they’d rather suffer themselves if they can sleep soundly at night with the knowledge that brown people are hopefully suffering even more.

Then those politicians take office and have no interest in balancing a budget or keeping spending under control because, just like Donald Trump said last week, they won’t be in office when the bottom falls out. Democratic leadership will have to come in, fix everything, and then the cycle repeats itself.

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