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WaPo: Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates

Pay workers more and treat them like people. If your employees feel expendable, they have no problem ghosting on that spot that you’ll easily fill with someone else you don’t care about.

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Economists report that workers are starting to act like millennials on Tinder: They’re ditching jobs with nary a text.

“A number of contacts said that they had been ‘ghosted,’ a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact,” the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago noted in December’s Beige Book, which tracks employment trends.

National data on economic “ghosting” is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise.

(cont.)

The author says ghosting on a job, as in leaving and not telling anyone, is partly due to bad social skills.

But we all know that’s crap, don’t we?

I gave one job two month’s notice to replace me because I knew it’d be difficult and I loved my boss. I can go back to that job anytime I want and I have no hard feelings toward that office bc my transition out of the job was smooth, just as I thought it’d be.

Just one job tho.

Everybody else got two weeks or less because I was leaving due to how much I hated the job, the pay, the management, etc. These jobs are not loyal to workers so why should we be loyal to the job? They can fire you with no notice but you have to give them 2 to 4 weeks? Pfffffffft!

That job will be just fine and will most likely have your replacement next week. And some intentionally make your life hell after you put in your notice.

You get a notice if I feel like you deserve a notice.

And co-workers don’t need to know your business. I don’t need buddies at the office – that’s work. I’m on Twitter instead of roaming around making chit chat because office gossip is how you fumble your bag. I don’t need any whispers behind my back about anything.

None of that has to do with “social skills” or any other lazy excuse.
Pay workers more and treat them like people. If your employees feel expendable, they have no problem ghosting on that spot that you’ll easily fill with someone else you don’t care about.

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money

Fare evasion is none of your business.

Poor people are just doing their best to get by.

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I woke up to this tweet making the rounds.

 

A few hours later it’s already gone, and so is the rest of his account, because some people don’t like being confronted with counter-positions to their terrible opinions.

That’s beside the point though. I just wanted to take a moment to try explaining to this corner of the internet what it’s like to be poor and using transit in a metro area like DC or NYC or SF because a lot of people are just genuinely unaware of what it’s like. I lived it for years (I’m still poor for the record, but not Sleeping on a Mattress on the Floor in a Glorified Closet in a Building Where They Make Crack and Meth in the Basement kind of poor like I was) and a lot of people who get up in arms about fare evasion aren’t thinking about the people who evade fares.

Let’s get this out of the way: people with money jump the turnstiles too, in much fewer numbers, but I’ve seen it with my own eyes. I’ve seen groups of white kids on the Upper West Side in (ugly) designer clothes hop over the turnstile to catch the train because they never take the train and they don’t have a Metrocard and can’t be bothered to do it “just this one time” with their friends on an outing somewhere. I’ve seen professionals wearing relatively expensive office gear run to catch the train and hop over the turnstile because if they stopped to refill their card they would miss their train.

I never see tweets about them. I only see tweets from white people in gentrified neighborhoods playing Captain SaveAMetro being “concerned” with a public entity losing $2 because someone didn’t pay their fare. Do I know for sure that’s what Andrew was referring to? No, but I do know that a few years ago, Columbia Heights was named one of the fastest gentrifying neighborhoods in the country(x) and the Black population went from 58% in 2000 to 43% in 2010. (x)

Anyway, most people who jump the turnstiles aren’t doing it because they’re lazy and they’re not doing it for fun. They’re doing it because they have no other choice. Being poor is making calculated decisions with every penny you have. If you live in a metro area where public transit readily available think about the last trip you took to Target or a similar destination.

If you have your own car, you drove. That’s a luxury that the vast majority of poor people in densely populated areas do not have. We can’t afford a car and we definitely can’t afford to park it.

If you have enough disposable income, maybe you took an Uber. That $15 -$40 round trip (or more!) is two packs of toilet paper or a groceries for a week of dinner. Yeah it’s faster and more convenient, but if that’s not money you can afford to spend, you have to take public transit.

If you have a Metrocard you took the train both ways. That’s the cheapest option and that’s what most of us are left with…unless you don’t have enough to pay for both ways. Being poor means being creative and there were many times I figured out ways to avoid paying twice. In NYC, you can transfer from the subway to the bus for free and vice versa if you use your Metrocard within a couple of hours of swiping. This in place for people who don’t live in transit-heavy areas. If you live in Red Hook and work in Manhattan, you might need to take the bus to the train so you don’t have to walk a mile to the station and you shouldn’t have to pay twice for that. It inadvertently benefitted poor people, because cities don’t do anything for the express purpose of making life easier for poor people.  I would take the train to Target, do my shopping as quickly as possible, and then swipe my card again to take a bus home within the 2-hour transfer window. It would sometimes take me an extra hour to get home, but that’s money I could use to buy lunch the next day.

Another NYC hack from back in the day: there’s a free transfer between 59th/Lex and 63rd because the city wanted to make it convenient to go from the F at 63rd to the NQRW/456 at 59th, but the stations are four blocks away. If I could get what I needed from Target at Bed Bath & Beyond instead, I would take the train all the way into Manhattan and get off at 59th, go the Bed Bath & Beyond on 61st and First, shop as quickly as possible, and go back into the system at 63rd/Lex and take the F for free. I didn’t live anywhere near an F train so sometimes the trip home would take an extra half an hour but, again, I saved enough money for lunch.

If you’ve never paid for a McDouble with quarters, you’ve never had to think about saving $2.50 whenever you can.

So why was I buying McDonald’s instead of cooking? A few reasons.

I lived in an apartment with three other strangers, and nobody had pots and pans. I was working for barely more than minimum wage so I wasn’t able to actually save enough money to buy anything. I used my paychecks on bologna and ramen and made that stretch for a week because that equivalent cost in nutritious food would last for one meal, maybe two.

And I didn’t have time to cook. I worked three crappy jobs to make ends meet, so my day regularly started with waking up at 5am so I could be on the train by 530am and at my job before 7. I’d work from 7 to Noon at the first job (all shifts were less than 5.5 hours because any more than that and the job would have to pay you for an extra break or — god forbid — bump you up to fulltime and give you health benefits) and then hoof it to the next job. I’ve had jobs that were technically close enough to walk, so I would walk the twenty blocks to the next job if the weather was nice enough. If it wasn’t, I’d have to pay money (that I hadn’t budgeted for) to get to my next job, but more on that later. Let’s say the weather was nice. My shift started at 12:30 so I had thirty minutes to walk a mile and eat something. What was I going to eat that wasn’t crap? I can’t afford a $12 salad. I don’t have leftovers from the dinner I couldn’t afford to cook. Lunch was hitting up Wendy’s or McDonald’s for something cheap that I could buy with extra laundry quarters and then I’d clock in for my next 5 hour shift. Clock out at 5:30 and hoof it over to my 3rd job before 6. Same food situation. Same walking or train situation. Another five hours and then I’m on the train home around Midnight. I get home at 1am and, even if I had enough money for a fridge full of groceries, when would I have time to cook them?

I just want to paint the picture for people who’ve never been poor that this is what daily life is like when you are barely scraping by. If you feel like you’re living paycheck to paycheck, but your day is an 8 hour shift in an office Monday – Friday, you don’t actually know how exhausting it is to truly live paycheck to paycheck. You probably haven’t actually lived paycheck to paycheck if you’ve never worked in a place where half the employees got these out of the vending machine on their break:

If your job doesn’t have these in the vending machine because they know their workforce is underpaid and stressed for time, you don’t need to be commenting about fare evasion.

So let’s get back to why someone would evade the fare.

If I just left my job in Soho and I need to get to my job in Chelsea, I could walk for 20-30 minutes, but it just started pouring rain. If I pay for the train, I can’t afford my 4 for $4 to power me through this next shift. I can’t call out because I need those hours on my next check in order to afford my rent, and that’s assuming I wouldn’t be fired for calling out anyway. So I jump the turnstile.

If I’m at home on my day off but one of my jobs calls me to come in, I could decline because I don’t have the subway fare, but that would mean missing out on an extra $50 in my check a couple of weeks from now. I could use some of the lunch money I allotted for the next few days, but what will I eat? Maybe I’ll just pay for a trip to work and then plan to walk back (something I did regularly back in the day — walk home for 3 hours after a shift because I couldn’t afford the fare and the weather was nice) but if work was exhausting or the weather was bad, I might hop the turnstile to come home.

If I’m out of a job but I get a job interview, I don’t want to walk there because I’ll be sweaty, but I need to go, because I need a job. I’m hopping the turnstile.

So maybe we should be more concerned about the reasons people hop the gate than whether the metro is getting their $2? And let’s be clear — they’re not out any money when someone evades the fare. If they didn’t have the money anyway, then no money was missed, because their options were riding for free or not riding at all. In both scenarios, the metro makes no money. And the cost of running a train is exactly the same whether it’s full or empty. So when you get upset about fare evasion, what are you really upset about? That poor people are getting something for free that you had to pay for? Take a beat and think about why that bothers you and then mind your business.

 

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economy

CNBC: The budget breakdown of a 25-year-old who makes $100,000 a year and is excellent with money

Gen X & Baby Boomer media is about making millennials feel shitty about not being exponentially more successful and more educated than they had to be at the same age to maintain the same standard of living. Y’all had my salary with a HS diploma working at Auto Zone. Go away.

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Trevor Klee, he admits, is a “terrible employee.” But he’s great at working for himself — and at taking tests.

So the 25-year-old entrepreneur started a thriving business of his own. As a test prep instructor in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he brings in $100,000 a year tutoring people for the GMAT, GRE and LSAT. “It’s one of those weird skills that turned out to be really monetizable,” he tells CNBC Make It.

Klee is the first to acknowledge he’s benefited from both luck and privilege: “Growing up in a family that talked a lot about money was a definite advantage,” he says. “In a lot of ways, I feel like I’m good with money, but I’m playing life on ‘Easy’ mode: I’m a single guy with no dependents and I make a pretty solid income.”

Here’s a look at how Klee earns, saves and spends his money, and how he gives it away

(cont.)

typical

He’s 25 years old and makes $100,000 a year paying $825 rent.

When I was 25 I made $30,000 a year paying $900 rent.

I don’t understand who these articles are for.

Gen X & Baby Boomer media is about making millennials feel shitty about not being exponentially more successful and more educated than they had to be at the same age to maintain the same standard of living. Y’all had my salary with a HS diploma working at Auto Zone. Go away.

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economy

Vox: Paul Ryan’s Long Con

Anybody still giving the benefit of the doubt to Republicans needs to go outside and break off a switch. Republicans keep playing this “fiscal responsibility” card, and too many of us keep falling for it to debate its merits as if their positions ever hold fast once they get elected. “Fiscal responsibility” is a catchphrase to bring two groups to the polls: rich people and poor whites.

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paulryan

House Speaker Paul Ryan’s legacy can be summed up in just one number: $343 billion.

That’s the increase between the deficit for fiscal year 2015 and fiscal year 2018— that is, the difference between the fiscal year before Ryan became speaker of the House and the fiscal year in which he retired.

If the economy had fallen into recession between 2015 and 2018, Ryan’s record would be understandable. But it didn’t. In fact, growth quickened and the labor market tightened — which means deficits should’ve fallen. Indeed, that’s exactly what happened in each of the five years preceding Ryan’s speakership; from 2011 to 2015, annual deficits fell each year.

As he prepares to leave office, Ryan says that debt reduction is one of those things “I wish we could have gotten done.” Ryan, the man with the single most power over the federal budget in recent years, sounds like a bystander, as if he watched laws happen rather than made them happen.

(cont.)

paulryan

Anybody still giving the benefit of the doubt to Republicans needs to go outside and break off a switch. Republicans keep playing this “fiscal responsibility” card, and too many of us keep falling for it to debate its merits as if their positions ever hold fast once they get elected. “Fiscal responsibility” is a catchphrase to bring two groups to the polls: rich people and poor whites.

Rich people hear “fiscal responsibility” and they know their taxes will be cut. The GOP uses “fiscal responsibility” as part of their funny math to justify cutting taxes for corporations and rich people. The rich don’t actually care that the math doesn’t add up — they just know the politicians they elected are using that ruse to get over on the rest of the country, that their politicians are saying “we have to curb spending, and once we have less stuff to pay for, we don’t need as much tax revenue coming in” and then voila — the rich get richer.

Poor whites hear “fiscal responsibility” and they feel like the coloreds and the immigrants will be getting fewer handouts. Never mind the fact that it’s Republican states that take the most from the federal government and contribute the least, because facts don’t matter. Only perception matters, and the perception among poor whites is that they are struggling while Blacks & Muslims & Mexicans are living high on the hog thanks to welfare programs that taxes pay for. Why should they get free stuff from the government while Good Americans (white ones) are scrimping and saving to pay the bills? Those poor whites vote for politicians pimping austerity measures against their own self-interests because they’d rather suffer themselves if they can sleep soundly at night with the knowledge that brown people are hopefully suffering even more.

Then those politicians take office and have no interest in balancing a budget or keeping spending under control because, just like Donald Trump said last week, they won’t be in office when the bottom falls out. Democratic leadership will have to come in, fix everything, and then the cycle repeats itself.

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